Parents
  1250 John Parker, Sr. Katherine Dennis
1601 - 1651 About 1580- 1601
Parentseorheham, evon,
  William Crocombe Marjorie Unknown
1575 – 1619  
HUSBAND
1160 John Parker, Jr.
b. 20 Apr 1601
Georgeham, Devon, England
d. 1648 - 1661
Sagadohoc, Maine, USA
WIFE

Mary Crocombe

b. 28 Jan 1600
Georgeham, Devon, England
d. After 1671
Maine
Relationship Events:
  Marriage John Parker, Jr. to Mary Crocombe on Nov 16, 1622 in Georgeham, Devon, England
CHILDREN:
  James Parker b. 5 Aug 1627 in Georgeham Devon, England; d. 1630
Georgeham Devon, England


Died Young
Ancestor Leaf Thomas Parker b.1630 in Bideford, Devon, England; d. 13 Nov 1684
Georgetown, Sagadahoc, Maine
m.
Mary (Shaw?)
Seven Children: Jacob, Mary, Grace, John, Sarah, Remember, and Margaret Parker
  John Parker 1634 in Bideford, Devon, England; d.20 May 1690, slain with son James by Indians at Fort Loyal, Falmouthm Naine
m.
Margaret Fairfield on 20 Jul 1660 in Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts Four Children: Mary, Elizabeth,James, and Daniel Parker
  Mary Parker b. 25 July 1635 in Bideford, Devon, England;d. 1700 in Georgetown, Parker Island, Maine
m.
Thomas Webber c. 1655 in Charlestown, Massachusetts John, Samuel, James, Joseph, Sarah, Lydia, Thomas, Nathaniel, Mary
What We Know

 

Chief Robin HoodIn 1649 John Parker, Jr. purchased Roscohegan Island (later renamed as Parker Island) from Chief Mowhatawormit, who signed the deed with his mark, and his name was given as Robert Hood (Whood). The land involved was described as lying to the eastward side of "Sacittihock River's mouth" running northeast to the "Shipscut River".

John Parker, Jr. built a home on the lower end of Parker's Island facing the sea, and until his death prior to Nov. 20, 1661, lived there with his wife Mary. In a deed of June 29, 1671, the widow Mary conveyed to her son Thomas Parker and his heirs "the house and field and a parcel of Marsh bounded by the Creek lying upon the westward side (Little River)". Sarah Parker, daughter of Thomas, and her husband Matthew Salter, also lived on the lower end of Parker's Island until driven off by Indians.

In October 1651, John Jr. made out a will. It appears that both he and his father died between then and 1654.

On Nov 22 1652, one of the John Parker's took the oath of allegiance to Massachusetts government.

Thomas Webber settled on the northern end of Parker’s Island by 1650 and was married to Mary Parker by 1661, when her father's will was probated, Webber had 300 acres of farmland on Webber Point, and also had a farm on Webber Island where he raised sheep.

 

 

Probate was administered on John Jr.'s estate on November 20, 1661. According to the confirmation secured by Mary Parker in 1661, this was a portion of what is now Georgetown Island; “I Robert W. Hood, Sagamore of Sacatyhock and Kennebeck have formerly sold unto John Parker Sen of Sacatyhock and his heirs a Tract of land on the Easter Side of Sacatyhock being an island commonly called by the mane of Sagosett alias Chegoney by the Indians I say having sold the island with all the Islets Appurtenences and Privleges whatsoever due to the Tract of Land belong or anyways appertain and having given him a Deed of Sale for the assurance of his right thereto bearing Date One thousand Six hundred Fourty and eight and that the now the said John Parker being deceased I the above said Rober Whood do of my own voluntary will and consent confirm the said Deed."

On June 29, 1671, Mary, the widow of John Jr., conveyed to her son Thomas Parker and his heirs “the house and field and parcel of marsh bounded by the creek lying upon the westward side (Little River). Sarah Parker, daughter of Thomas, and her husband Matthew Salter, also lived on the lower end of Parker’s Island until driven off by Indians,

 

 

 

 

All their children were born in England so John moved his family to Winter Harbor between  25 July 1635 when his last child Mary was born and 7 Sep 1636, when John Parker Jr. was head of household in the Winter Harbor book of rates and assessed a tax of 1 pound for support of the minister.  John died between 31 Oct 1651 when he made his will and 20 Nov 1661 when the Deed for Parker’s Island was confirmed to his widow Mary Parker by Robinhood at her house in Sagadahoc, Maine.

20 May 1645 – Massachusetts court records state that Robert Nash, a coastal trader out of Mass Bay on a voyage downest, stopped in to Strattons Island Plantation. He began selling sack, a white wine imported from the south of Europe, to the island fishermen. Nash was himself consuming a large quantity and was, according to depositions, soon very drunk and giving it away. John Parker II also arrived there about this time with a number of fishermen either to or from Damariscove, and his men quickly joined the islanders in lining up for free drinks, as did Nash’s own crew. From all accounts Parker did not join in, but couldn’t deter his men from getting drunk. Testimony of John Parker II:

“John Parkar of Damarills Cove affermeth that Robart nash being with him gaue & sould so much sack to his men that nash himself and parkers men were all so drunk for seuarall dais together that his men could not goe to Sea in the prime tyme of fishing whereby the said parkar & his company lost 40 or 50 pownds by the misdemeanors of said nash”

On Sept.7th 1636, John Parker II was head of household in the Winter Harbor book of rates and assessed a tax of 1 pound for support of the minister.

John II appears to have remained in Gorges employ and in 1636 is found managing the fishing station at Winter Harbor. It appears that he will become the district manager, taking over his father's duties for Gorge's network of stations along the Maine coast. There is no concrete evidence for all of this, but the clues when pieced together would suggest this chronology. The historian Rev. Henry O. Thayer, wrote a biography of John Parker which can be found in one of his scrapbooks. Thayer recognized that there were two adult John Parkers in 1636, but was not aware of their relationship as father and son. He places one at Sagadahoc and the other at Winter Harbor correctly. He fails to see the son moving his family to Arrowsic Island to join his father following Vines' departure in 1645. (There were actually three John Parkers. The John who was married to Margaret is unrelated to ours, but has been confused with them).

All their children were born in England so John did not move his family to Winter Harbor until after Mary was born. John II had a crew of fishermen stationed at Damariscove on the 20th of May 1645, just 6 months. before Vines would leave. The elder Parker would have then been 77 years old, so it would seem likely this was his son, age 44. It appears that John II, as district manager was responsible for numerous stations including Damariscove, but according to those deeds had not moved his family to Damariscove.

Massachusetts court records involving John II state on 20th of May 1645, Robert Nash, a coastal trader our of Mass Bay on a voyage downest, stopped in to Strattons Island Plantation. He began selling sack, a white wine imported from the sout of Europe, to the island fishermen. Nash was himself consuming a large quantity and was, according to depositions, soon very drink and giving it away. John Parker II also arrived there about this time with a number of fishermen either to or from Damariscove, and his men quickly joined the islanders in lining up for free drinks, as did Nash’s own crew. From all accounts Parker did not join in, but couldn’t deter his men from getting drunk. Testimony of John Parker II “John Parkar of Damarills Cove affermeth that Robart nash being with him gaue & sould so much sack to his men that nash himself and parkers men were all so drunk for seuarall dais together that his men could not goe to Sea in the prime tyme of fishing whereby the said parkar & his company lost 40 or 50 pownds by the misdemeanors of said nash”

He made out a will in October 1651, and it appears that both he and his father died between then and 1654.

John Parker, Jr., the younger son of John Sr., lived on Arrowsic and was in the fishing trade until Indian raids drove him to the west bank of the Kennebec. He later returned to Stage (Sagadahoc) Island, where others from Parker’s Island found refuge from King Philip’s depredations. The fort there was evacuated in 1689 and no further attempts were made to settle Parker’s Island and Arrowsic until 1710. At Indian Point (then Sagadahoc Point) there had been an Indian raid in 1662. (A 1748 deed transfers ownership of land on Indian Point out of the Parker family line to George Rogers on the site of the Sadie Drake house on what is now Indian Point Road.)

Thomas was living at Reskeagan [now Georgetown], an island near the mouth of the Kennebec, as early as 1649. He married Mary, daughter of the proprietor, John Parker, and owned immense tracts of land reaching from Kennebec river to Casco Bay. Thomas and Mary (Parker) Webber had five sons, who settled about Falmouth and Harpswell, and it is probable from these sons that most of the Maine Webbers are descended. The Indian wars, beginning in 1688 and lasting about ten years, drove the Webbers into Massachusetts, where they lived at Charlestown and Gloucester.

Deed: Robin Hood, alias Rawmegon, Terrumpquine, Wesomonascoe, Sagamores of Scawque, and Abumhamen Indians, sell to Thomas Webber land on the westerly side of the Kennebeck River [copy] and memorandum by Charles Cushing Paine, 29 May 1660

On account of the Indian attacks in the war of 1690 Thomas Webber returned to Massachusetts with a big family. His wife Mary was living at Charlestown in 1692. He died before 1695.

Burrough’s Witch Trial

Mary Parker Webber was about  53 years old when she testified in the  Burrough’s Witch Trial in Salem 2 Aug 1692. She repeated accusations she heard from Burrough’s deceased wife.  Her son Samuel Webber also testifed about Burroughs’ unnatural strength,

Salem – 2 Aug 1692 Mary Webber wid aged aboute 53 years Testifieth and sayth that she liveing at Casco Bay aboute six or seaven years agoe, when George Burroughs was Minester at s’d place, and liveing anner — Neighbour to s’d Burroughs, was well acquainted with his wife w’ch was dauter to mr John Ruck of Salem she hath heard her tell much of her husband unkindness to her and that she dare not wright to her father to acquaint [him] how it was with her, and soe desired mee to wright to her father that he would be pleased to send for her and told mee she had beene much affrighted, and that something in the night made anoise in the chamber where she lay as if one Went aboute the Chamber, and she calling up the negro. to come to her the negro not Comeing sayd that she could not Come some thing stopt her, then her husband being called he came up. some thing Jumped down from between the Chimney & the side of the house and Run down the stairs and s’d Burroughs followed it down, and the negro then s’d it was something like a white calfe: another tyme lyeing with her husband some thing came into the house and stood by her bed side and breathed on her, and she being much affrighted at it, would have awakened her husband but could not for a considerable tyme, but as soone as he did awake it went away., but this I heard her say. and know nothing of it myselfe otherwise Except by common report of others also concerning such things.

George Burroughs Fact Sheet

He was the second Salem Village minister, but quarreled over his salary and left.
  • He had five children.
  • He was widowed three times.
  • His second wife died about a year after their arrival in Salem Village.
  • After his second wife’s death, he remarried and moved to Maine.
  • He was rumored to have mistreated his wives.
  • One of his children was not baptized; a fact that was brought up in his trial.
  • He was well known for his physical strength.
  • Upon his arrest for witchcraft, his wife took everything that was valuable in the house, sold his books and loaned the money for interest. She then took her own daughter and left George’s children to fend for themselves.
  • During his trial, witnesses testified that his two dead wives came to them in their dreams explaining that he had killed them.
  • He was also identified by the afflicted girls as the “Black Minister” and leader of the Salem Coven.
  • At his execution, he repeated the Lord’s Prayer flawlessly.

George Burroughs By Amy Nichols

The story of the Rev. George Burroughs is important because of its differences from the other accusations. Burroughs was one of the few men executed during the trails, and he was the only clergyman accused of witchcraft. He has often been portrayed in popular accounts of the trials, because some of his accusers claimed him to be the “ring leader” of the witches and because of the especially dramatic nature of his execution in the presence of the Rev. Cotton Mather.

George Burroughs was born to a rather well-to-do family in Suffolk, England in about 1652. At a young age he left England for Massachusetts Bay Colony and was raised by his mother in the town of Roxbury. He later attended Harvard College and graduated in 1670. After graduating, he moved to Maine and started preaching in Falmouth (Portland, Maine) until the town was attacked by Indians in 1676, forcing him to leave. He was a minister in Salisbury for a few years and eventually in 1680 was called to Salem Village to be the new minister.

The issues leading up to his accusation as a witch are rooted in the events that happened in his two-year stay in Salem Village. One of the major complaints seems to have been Burroughs’ unconventional religious beliefs. In the book Salem Story, Bernard Rosenthal, stresses the significance of the fact that the Rev. Increase Mather and his son Cotton Mather, both prominent ministers in Boston, did not agree with Burroughs’ religious convictions. Rosenthal suggests Cotton Mather may have suspected him of being a Baptist. When on trial questions put forward to Burroughs dealt with his religious practices, especially the baptism of his children and his lack of attendance at the Lord’s Supper, in an attempt to expose his deviance from Puritan doctrines.

Burroughs, as minister of the Salem Town in 1680-1683, also became involved in village quarrels. In one instance, Thomas Putnam lent Burroughs some money, and when he was unable to pay the money back, the town reacted strongly and he was pushed out of Salem. In 1683 he returned to Maine.

On April 30, 1692, Burroughs, together with several others, was accused of witchcraft. The original document stating the charges was signed by Thomas Putnam and Jonathan Walcott. Burroughs was charged with “high suspicion of sundry acts of witchcraft done or committed by then upon the bodies of Mary Walcot Marcy Lewis Abigail Williams Ann Putnam and Eliz. Hubbard and Susan Sheldon.” On May 4, 1692, he was forcefully taken from his home in Wells, Maine, to Salem, and put in jail.

One man fueling the attacks on Burroughs was Cotton Mather. Cotton Mather was at this time known for his cautionary writings on how spectral evidence in the trials should be used. However, as Rosenthal suggests, in Burroughs’ case Mather put aside his views on the unreliability of spectral evidence, further suggesting that Mather’s hatred of Burroughs was based on Burroughs’ role as a religious dissident.

For this reason, Burroughs can be viewed as the one person executed for witchcraft for his religious beliefs. As Puritan dissenter Burroughs was attacked by the Puritans and seen as harmful to their society. The first question asked of Burroughs at his trail was whether his children were all baptized. He said only one of them was. On August 3, 1692, many testified against Burroughs. Young girls such as Elizabeth Hubbard, Mercy Lewis, Susannah Sheldon, Mary Walcott and Ann Putnam all claimed that he had come to them and tried to force them to sign his book which Elizabeth said was written in words “as red as blood”. Mercy Lewis claimed that Burroughs “carried me up to an exceeding high mountain and shewed me all the kingdoms of the earth and told me that he would give them all to me if I would writ in his book”(Salem Witchcraft Papers). Accused witches such as Abigail Hobbs and Mary Warren charged him with bringing them into the world of Satan. He was the “ring leader of them all” holding the meetings in Salem and trying to force many away from God and to Satan.

Another factor working against Burroughs was the fact that his first two wives had died. Ann Putnam claimed that the two wives came to her as visions and told her that Burroughs had killed them and that he was indeed working for the Devil. John and Rebecca Putnam claimed he was “sharp with his wife”.

Burroughs was also known for his superhuman strength. Men [including Samuel WEBBER, the son of Thomas and Mary Parker Webber] at the trial testified that they had seen him “put his fingers into the Bung Barrall and lifted it up, and carried it round him and set it downe again”(SWP). Others claimed that he was able to lift up a six-foot gun using one hand with no difficulty. His brut strength was more proof of his allegiance with the devil.

All this testimony lead the court to conclude that Burroughs was indeed a sorcerer and was in fact the leader of the witchcraft related events. As Boyer and Nissenbaum seem to suggest, Burroughs was in a way used as a scapegoat. By attributing to him the role of the ringleader, the witchcraft problem was no longer associated with the community of Salem Village but was put upon the shoulders of one man, George Burroughs.

From the actual documents, one can conclude that Burroughs was a man with powerful enemies in Salem Village. The fact that he was a minister did little to soften the accusations against him. The other key player was Cotton Mather. Rosenthal’s theory that Burroughs was a religious dissenter is highly plausible. Mather was after Burroughs because he believed him to be a Baptist as well as a witch.

Burroughs’ trial was the only one attended by Increase Mather. Mather believed that if someone could perfectly recite the Lord’s Prayer then he or she was not a witch. However, as Robert Calef writes in his book More Wonders of the Invisible World,  “Mr. Burroughs was carried, through the streets of Salem to Execution; when he was upon the Ladder, he made a Speech for the clearing of his Innocency, with such Solemn and Serious Expressions, as were to the Admiration of all present; his Prayer (which he concluded by repeating the Lord’s Prayer) was so well worded, and uttered with such composedness, and such (at least seeming) fervency of Spirit, as was very affecting, and drew Tears from many ( so that is seemed to some that the Spectators would hinder the Execution)”.

Nathaniel Hawthorne describes this scene in his powerful story Main Street

Mary Parker Webber at Salem:

The Salem Witchcraft Papers(1977) Vol. 1, pp. 162-163: Mary Webber v. George Burroughs

(Mary Webber v. George Burroughs)

    Mary Webber wid aged aboute 53 years Testifieth and sayth that  she liveing at Casco Bay aboute six or seaven years agoe, when  George Burroughs was Minester at s'd place, and liveing anner --  Neighbour to s'd Burroughs, was well acquainted with his wife w'ch was dauter to mr John Ruck of Salem she hath heard her tell much of her husband unkindness to her and that she dare not wright  to her father to acquaint [him] how it was with her, and soe desired 
mee to wright to her father that he would be pleased to send for  her and told mee she had beene much affrighted, and that something  in the night made a noise in the chamber where she lay as if one Went aboute the Chamber, and she calling up the negro. to come to her  the negro not Comeing sayd that she could not Come some thing stopt her, then her husband being called he came up. some thing Jumped down from between the Chimney & the side of the house  and Run down the stairs and s'd Burroughs followed it down, and  the negro then s'd it was something like a white calfe: another tyme 
lyeing with her husband some thing came into the house and stood  by her bed side and breathed on her, and she being much affrighted  at it, would have awakened her husband but could not for a considerable tyme, but as soone as he did awake it went away., but this  I heard her say. and know nothing of it myselfe otherwise Except by  common report of others also concerning such things Salem.

August 2'd 1692 

*mary webber 

Massachusetts Historical Society )  

VITAL RECORDS:

 

The Find-a-Grave Memorial for John Parker gives us additional information,

 

GEORGETOWN ISLAND (Maine)

A Brief Historical Perspective by Carolyn F. "Billie" Todd (Excerpts)

Many scenes and dramas have passed within the purview of Georgetown Island, situated at the mouth of the Kennebec River.  In pre-history, Native Americans of the Abenaki Confederacy were the first identifiable tribes to use the island, coming down from Norridgewock and the Penobscot region to gourmandize on oysters, fish and clams, and to hunt in winter for ducks and beaver. Originally it was believed that the area was mostly frequented in the summer. However, more recent scientific analysis of growth rings on shells in middens suggests year-round habitation

It is established that Viking ships visited the shores in the 10th century, perhaps landing, and it may be surmised that the Phoenicians could have appeared even a thousand years earlier.  Word of the teeming fishing grounds passed from one culture to another and, before the days of Columbus, French, English, Italian, and Portuguese ships made forays into the area.  Sir Francis Drake (1540-1596) and George Weymouth sailed into the Sheepscot and the Kennebec Rivers and reported back to their British sovereign.  It was Weymouth who kidnapped six Indians from Monhegan and took them back to England as curiosities. There they received V.I.P. treatment and learned some English. One of these was Squanto, which turned out to be a good thing for him as during his absence, his fellow Indians back home were decimated by disease, probably smallpox.

As far as is known, there were no permanent European communities in the “New World” until the Spaniards founded St. Augustine in Florida in 1565.  This was followed by the settlement of Jamestown, Virginia in 1607, coincidentally the same year as the Popham Colony was established in Phippsburg at the mouth of the Kennebec. The Pilgrims at Plymouth, (enjoying better public relations via Henry Wadsworth Longfellow and Felicia Hemans), were really Johnny-come-latelies, and avoided starvation through the generosity of the people of Damariscove. The rigors of Maine's winters put an end to the Popham Colony in 1608, the survivors returning to England, but not before they had made a contribution to history with the building of the 30-ton ship "Virginia", reputedly the first English colonial ship built on these shores.

The Popham Colony sat on the west bank of the Kennebec, at the mouth of the river. On the east bank was the island of Roscohegan, which belonged to an Indian tribe headed by Chief Mowhatawormit. Colonists having difficulty with his tribal name called him Robert Hood or Robin Hood. The reference was to the Lord of Misrule who dominated the X-rated revels in the Middle Ages, rather than to the engaging freebooter of Sherwood Forest. In 1616 Captain John Webber, with mate and brother-in-law, John Parker, sailed in the Mayflower (not the Pilgrim ship) and established a trading post with the Indians.  He must have discovered Roscohegan early in his travels and found it fair, for the Plymouth Colony was trading here no later than 1625. Parker himself came annually. The Indian name for the mouth of the Kennebec was "Sagadahoc", descriptive of the turbulent tidal water. Stage Island was known as "Sagadahoc Island".

By 1630 John Parker possessed 100 acres of land on Arrowsic Island and had built a house on Squirrel Point. (This fact may be a confusion with the John arker who was unrelatrd to ours). In 1649 he purchased Roscohegan Island (later renamed as Parker Island) from Chief Mowhatawormit, who signed the deed with his mark, and his name was given as Robert Hood (Whood). The land involved was described as lying to the eastward side of "Sacittihock River's mouth" running northeast to the "Shipscut River".

That same year, 1649, John Richards bought the island of Arrowsic from Chief Robin Hood. In 1654, Richards sold Arrowsic to Thomas Clark and Roger Spencer. Spencer then sold his share to Thomas Lake. John Parker sold his house and land on Arrowsic to Clark and Lake, who in 1658-9 laid out a town on the south end of the island with streets and eventually a fort and trading post.

The Plymouth Company, formed from the Plymouth Colony, in 1630 had procured a grant on the Kennebec that guaranteed them the river trade in fish and furs as they dealt with the Indians. They were succeeded by the firm of Clark and Lake. In 1654, all the territory on the lower Kennebec, as far up as the Chops on Merrymeeting Bay, was called New Plymouth, and was governed by Old Plymouth in the Massachusetts Bay Colony. The first John Parker built a home on the lower end of Parker's Island facing the sea, and until his death prior to Nov. 20, 1661, lived there with his wife Mary.

In a deed of June 29, 1671, the widow Mary conveyed to her son Thomas Parker and his heirs "the house and field and a parcel of Marsh bounded by the Creek lying upon the westward side (Little River)". Sarah Parker, daughter of Thomas, and her husband Matthew Salter, also lived on the lower end of Parker's Island until driven off by Indians.

John Parker, Jr., the younger son of John Sr., lived on Arrowsic and was in the fishing trade until Indian raids drove him to the west bank of the Kennebec. He later returned to Stage (Sagadahoc) Island, where others from Parker's Island found refuge from King Philip's depredations. The fort there was evacuated in 1689 and no further attempts were made to settle Parker's Island and Arrowsic until 1710. At Indian Point (then Sagadahoc Point) there had been an Indian raid in 1662. (A 1748 deed transfers ownership of land on Indian Point out of the Parker family line to George Rogers on the site of the Sadie Drake house on what is now Indian Point Road.)

In 1676 the Clark & Lake Fort on Arrowsic was totally destroyed by fire in a major raid.  In 1714 Newtowne-on-Arrowsic was rebuilt by John White.  In 1716, residents of Arrowsic petitioned to form a town which became Georgetown-on-Arrowsic.  A few years later, Parker's Island, Stage Island, and the Plantation of Nequasset were incorporated into that municipality.  All efforts to locate the Charter have failed. It is neither in the archives at Boston nor in Augusta. In 1723 all dwellings on Arrowsic were burned in Indian raids and inhabitants fled to garrisons. 

Maritime History of Bath by William Avery Baker states that Thomas Webber settled on the northern end of Parker's Island by 1650.  Before 1661 he married Mary Parker, daughter of John Parker the First. Thomas Webber had 300 acres of farmland on Webber Point, and also had a farm on Webber Island where he raised sheep.  Jeremiah Beal 1 was born in Georgetown May 1773, to parents Samuel and 0live Beal.  It is not clear at what point the Beals made their home on Beal Island.  Jeremiah is buried on the island.  The first David Oliver came to Georgetown from Boston to fish at Pemaquid.  Around 1670 he married Grace Parker, granddaughter of John Parker the First. When David and Grace were living at Stage Island during the Indian raids between 1677 and 1679, Indians destroyed their home and about 60 others. They fled from the island and petitioned Sir Edmund Andros for land in the southern part of Arrowsic.  David and the other settlers were granted land in Newtowne where they lived for 10 years or less. During this time the Indians had burned Newtowne.  By 1680 King William's War was well under way and in 1703 it became Queen Anne's War, lasting through 1713. By this time the island was deserted as settlers fled from the area.  David and Grace Oliver took refuge in Marblehead, Massachusetts. In May, David is listed as Capt. Rowden's Company of the Massachusetts Militia for service in the Indian Wars.  David's two sons, Thomas and David Jr., both received land opposite Long Island in the Kennebec: Lot #4 in the division of the estate of their grandfather Thomas Parker, on land which is now Bay Point.

What had begun as a fishing community in the 1600's was expanding into mills, which produced shingles, lumber and flour. There were carding mills to prepare wool for spinning, because sheep raising was a big industry on the island.  In the 1700's, tidewater mills could be found wherever there was power to activate them. The eastern and western mill ponds (branches) at the southern end of Robinhood Cove were ideal. The lumber mill on the western branch, which was built by David Oliver and Thomas Trafton, continued to be operated into the first decade of the 20th century, and the mill dam can still be seen.  David Oliver, Jr. had a son David of the 3rd generation (grandson of David and Grace). He and his wife, Hannah Stacy, came to Georgetown from Lynn, Massachusetts.  He and his father, David Jr., and Thomas Trafton, built their first lumber mill on the eastern branch of the Cove on what is now the Indian Point Road.  Later they built a second lumber mill on the west branch of the Cove Thomas Trafton also had a gristmill on the west bank of the western branch, near the former old Post Office at the bottom of the hill in Georgetown Center. According to the 1759 map, Trafton had Lot #19 and Oliver Lot #20. Both built log cabins nearby. Oliver's cabin was on the road and Tafton’s was farther down the slope nearer the water. The fourth generation David Oliver (son of David and Hannah Stacy) "lived in a log cabin near the marsh."  David 4 and his wife Agnes Campbell are buried on the Trafton farm at Georgetown Center (site of the Georgetown Central School), their graves marked by small black slate stones.

Special gratitude to Mark Miner for his excellent research on our mutual Parker ancestors. Miner's Descent is worth a visit.

 

Family Tree Home Page